Blog
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in burglary

Arlington Heights, IL property crime defense attorney

There are multiple crimes that can fall under the category of property crime. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), property crimes include burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. The latest statistics from the FBI estimate that there were nearly 7.2 million property crimes committed in the United States in 2017. In Illinois, property is defined as “anything of value,” meaning property crimes also include offenses that involve deception, fraud, plus damage and trespass to real property. Although it may seem like property crimes are not as serious as other criminal acts, they can carry significant consequences.

Burglary

If a person has knowingly or without authority entered a building, home, dwelling, motor vehicle, or aircraft with the intent to commit a felony or theft, then that person has committed burglary. There are a variety of actions that could encompass burglary, but most commonly, burglary charges stem from a person taking or attempting to take property from inside a structure. Burglary is almost always a felony charge. If you do not cause damage to property, you will be charged with a Class 3 felony, facing a possible sentence of two to five years in prison. Likewise, if damage is caused to property, charges are increased to a Class 2 felony, which carries a sentence of three to seven years in jail.

...

Arlington Heights, IL Theft Lawyer

In casual conversation, robbery, theft, and burglary may seem synonymous, but in the criminal justice system, they are not. Robbery, theft, and burglary are three different charges that have very different consequences. 

Most people know these crimes all involve taking property that belongs to someone else, but there are various behaviors that constitute each offense. If you face robbery, theft, or burglary charges, it is important to understand the differences.

...

Illinois defense lawyerBurglary occurs when a person knowingly enters an enclosed dwelling, such as a house or school or a vehicle, such as a car or an aircraft, without authorization, and with the intention of committing a crime. A burglary charge is very serious, but there are some defenses that may be available to an accused person.

Potential Defenses Against Burglary:

  • Lawful entry - In this defense, a person had permission to enter the premises, so it can be argued that no breaking and entering occurred.
  • Lack of intent - The prosecution will try to prove that a person knowingly entered a building with the intent to commit a crime, and not for some other purpose. If intent cannot be proven, charges may be dropped.
  • Coercion - A person may be forced into committing a burglary by verbal or physical threats from another person. In some situations, coercion to commit burglary can be an act of domestic violence.
  • Incapacitation - Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol can impair a person’s judgment and awareness and lead them to commit a crime. A person can normally use this defense only if another person drugged them or caused them to be intoxicated.

Lengthy Jail Sentences

...

CALL US TODAY AT 847-253-3400 FOR A FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION