Blog
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Illinois dui

Arlington Heights DUI defense lawyerFelony DUI charges, otherwise called an aggravated DUI in the state of Illinois, can result in serious and life-long consequences. DUI convictions are also unique in that they may result in the suspension or revocation of the defendant’s Illinois driver’s license. Learn more about the potential consequences of a felony DUI charge, and discover how an experienced DUI criminal defense attorney may be able to improve the outcome if your case.

What Constitutes a Felony DUI?

Most often, felony DUI charges will stem from repeated offenses (three or more). However, there are other situations that may lead to a felony DUI, even on a first offense. Examples include:

...

Illinois DUI defense lawyerIllinois is notorious for its strict drunk driving laws. In fact, the state is one of the Mothers Against Drunk Driving’s (MADD) top-rated states for DUI enforcement. Now they are incorporating a new sobriety program that lets drivers keep their license while on probation. Appealing as that might sound, there are some critical elements to the program that defendants should be aware of before taking a plea bargain.

More on the New Sobriety Program

DUI conviction – be it the first or fifth – typically results in a suspension or revocation of a driver’s license. Some are eligible for a special license that allows them to drive with a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID), but not all. The new program, which is still in the testing phase, permits the driver to keep their license during their probation – but it comes at a cost. The driver must agree to random and routine breathalyzer tests throughout the day, even when they are at work, home, or in a social setting.

...

Illinois DUI defense attorneyIllinois is ranked one of the toughest states on driving under the influence – and for a good reason. License suspensions can occur upon the first conviction, and the third conviction is typically considered a felony. Of course, that leaves many drivers wondering just how long a conviction will stay on their record. Learn more about the DUI lookback period in Illinois, including what it may mean for your DUI charges case with help from the following information.

The Illinois Lookback

The lookback period of a state is the amount of time over which a conviction may impact a driver on subsequent charges. For most states, this is only a handful of years. In Illinois, the lookback period is for the life of the driver, so every conviction counts. A first conviction stays on your record permanently and can impact your case, even if the next charge is decades later.

...

Arlington Heights DUI defense lawyerBlood alcohol concentration, or BAC, is a measurement of the amount of alcohol in your bloodstream. Under the “rule of thumb,” it takes your body one hour to metabolize one drink, but there are several factors that can alter this. In fact, you might be driving much sooner than you should without knowing it. Learn more about how the body metabolizes alcohol and its influence your BAC levels, as well as more on what it could mean if you are pulled over by an officer, with help from the following information.

Factors That Can Influence Your BAC

Every person metabolizes alcohol differently, and there are numerous factors that come into play. For instance, a person with cirrhosis of the liver will typically metabolize alcohol slower than someone with a healthy liver. Other factors that can influence your body’s alcohol metabolism include:

...

alcohol-related offenses, Arlington Heights criminal defense attorney, driver’s license suspension, driving suspensions, Illinois DUI, third DUI, zero tolerance lawIllinois maintains a Zero Tolerance Law when it comes to underage drinking and driving. An underage driver whose blood alcohol content (BAC) is .08 or greater results in an immediate six-month driver’s license suspension. A refusal to submit to a chemical test on suspicion of a DUI is grounds for a 12-month suspension.

The state’s Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) statistics reveal that more than 400,000 people ages 12-20 reported alcohol use in 2011. However, due to the Zero Tolerance Law, a minor can have his or her driving privileges suspended even when not intoxicated at the legal limit of .08.

If a person under 21 tests with a blood alcohol level of .08 or higher, DUI laws take effect. A conviction can be permanently listed on a public driving record.

...

CALL US TODAY AT 847-253-3400 FOR A FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION