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Arlington Heights, Arlington Heights criminal defense lawyer, Arlington Heights drunk driving lawyer, drinking and driving, DUI, DUI arrest, DUI attorney, DUI charges, DUI lawyer, Illinois criminal defense lawyer, illinois dui attorney, refusing a chemical testReports indicate that approximately one-quarter of people pulled over in the U.S. refuse a breathalyzer test if asked. This can have serious consequences, even if you have not been drinking. Illinois driving laws include a clause that allows for a person’s license to be revoked purely on his or her refusal to submit to chemical testing when pulled over. In fact, a person can have his or her license suspended for a full year for refusing a breathalyzer test in Illinois. This is six months longer than if a person submits to a breathalyzer test and is found to have a blood alcohol content above the legal limit.

Recently, a Chicago guitarist was arrested for a drunk driving incident in which he allegedly struck and killed a pedestrian, and had a blood alcohol content that was twice the legal limit. However, when initially questioned, he refused to take a field sobriety test. He finally submitted to a breathalyzer nearly seven hours after the incident while he was in holding.

There are three types of chemical testing to determine sobriety employed by the state of Illinois—breath, urine and blood. According to DrivingUniversity.com, this is because in Illinois a statute of "implied consent" applies. By getting into your car and starting the ignition after you have been drinking, you automatically consent to a chemical test for alcohol in the event that you are asked. This is known as a "No Refusal" law. According to WGEM.com, there are currently nine states, Illinois included, that have No Refusal laws in place.

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Chicago DUI attorney, criminal offense, drinking and driving, drinking and riding, DUI, DUI attorney, Illinois DUI Lawyer, motorcycle accident, motorcycle accidents, motorcyclist DUI, Scott F. AndersoDrinking and driving is widely understood to be a dangerous and possibly life-ending activity. And throughout the past decades several national and statewide practices have been enacted with the aim of curbing drunk driving and fatalities caused by it. For motorcyclists, however, the message can often get lost in the context of the subculture of motorcycles, at least according to Motorcycle.com. Motorcycle.com notes how the subculture that surrounds riding often involves drinking, and the incentive to stop drinking and riding has "done anything but gone away."

Massive riding festivals encourage pit stops for drinking at local bars, and cyclist bar hopping is a common activity anywhere in the country. Some motorcycle clubs have, of course, stepped up and spoken against this practice, issuing rules that riders cannot drink until the bike is parked for the evening. Regardless, drinking and riding is a serious issue that continues to cost the lives of many cyclists. More than 45 percent of all riders killed in accidents, repots Motorcycle.com using statistics from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, "have alcohol in their system at the time of death."

But there is more. Cyclists killed in accidents are 2.5 times more likely than passenger vehicle drivers to have alcohol in their system—a fact that is indicative of the sometimes dangerously permissive air that surrounds motorcycle culture. Despite increased awareness of the problem, it does not seem to be getting better. While the number of drivers involved in a fatal crash with a BAC of .08 or higher decreased six percent in 2007, the number of motorcyclists with a BAC of .08 or higher actually increased by 10 percent.

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soda, alcohol, blood alcohol content, BAC, DUI, drinking and driving,

The results of a new study indicate that artificial sweeteners, like those found in diet sodas, increase people’s blood alcohol concentrations.

The study was conducted by Dr. Cecile A. Marczinski and lab assistant Amy L. Stamates at the Northern Kentucky University. The results were published in the medical journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. There were eight men and eight women, between the ages of 21 and 33 years old, that participated in the study. People who were infrequent drinkers were not included in the study. Also excluded were people with diabetes, psychiatric disorders, head trauma or any other injuries to the central nervous system, or anyone who has substance abuse problems. Participants came to three different sessions where they were given random drinks and then had their blood alcohol content measured. The drinks the study subjects were given were either vodka and Squirt soda, vodka and Diet Squirt soda, or vodka and a placebo drink. The drinks contained 1.97 ml/kg vodka mixed with 3.94 ml/kg of the soda or placebo. The vodka used in the drinks was 40 proof. The participants who consumed the drinks with the diet soda had significantly higher blood alcohol content than those that consumed the drinks made with regular soda. Levels measured averaged 18 percent higher. Those people also had greater impairment and slower response times. The conclusion of the study was that diet soda mixed with alcohol will result in higher blood alcohol contents than regular soda mixed with alcohol. The results of the study confirm findings from previous studies done about how diet sodas can affect blood alcohol levels. In 2011, a group of researchers surveyed people who were leaving bars. Participants of the survey shared what and how much they had drank, as well as letting researchers take breath samples. The study’s findings were that those that had consumed alcoholic beverages made with diet soda had higher blood alcohol readings. There are many things that can affect the results of a blood alcohol content test. If you’ve been arrested and charged with DUI, contact an experienced Arlington Heights criminal defense attorney to make sure your rights are protected.

The holiday season is a great time to spend with family and friends at parties, dinners, and other festive events. For some, the celebrations also include the imbibing of drinks--beer, wine, hot toddies, and more. Of course, this presents the risk that, when it is time to go home, one may get behind the wheel while under the influence. This is never a smart move, often leading to serious accidents, DUI charges, or both.

Holiday DUIThe prevalence of drinking and driving around certain holidays is well-known. It usually results in law enforcement officers stepping up their enforcement efforts around these times. In fact, some are even proposing changes the laws related to DUIs around certain high-risk holidays in order to further deter drunk driving.

Holiday DUIs

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