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Arlington Heights DUI Lawyer

According to the Illinois Secretary of State, there were 330 people killed in alcohol-related car crashes in Illinois last year. Those fatalities represented about 30 percent of the 1,090 people who were killed in all car crashes in the state in 2017. Because alcohol plays such a large role in traffic deaths, punishments are substantial.

Most who experience a DUI conviction have no idea just how much it costs, in addition to the loss of driving privileges. Here are eight hidden expenses that come with an Illinois DUI conviction:

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Illinois traffic violation attorney DUI distracted driving speedingThe winter holidays are generally the busiest time of the year for road travel. According to the American Automobile Association (AAA), an estimated 54 million Americans traveled for the Thanksgiving holidays in 2018, with 48.5 million of those people traveling by road. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reported that in 2017, 5,667 fatal crashes involving 14,199 people occurred in November and December alone. 

There are certain factors that Illinois state police have attributed to these fatalities, and these are referred to as the “fatal four:” speeding, DUI, distracted driving, and seat belt usage. Getting a ticket for any of these traffic violations can mean hefty fines and, in some cases, more serious punishments like driver’s license suspension or even jail time.

Speeding

Illinois police will be on the lookout for those who are speeding during the holiday season. Speed is one of the biggest factors in fatal crashes, which is why speeding is taken very seriously, especially if you are going more than 25 mph over the speed limit. If you are caught going 26-35 mph over the speed limit, you will be charged with a Class B misdemeanor. If you are caught going more than 35 mph over the speed limit, you will be charged with a Class A misdemeanor.

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Arlington Heights criminal defense attorney Miranda rightsIn 1966, the United States Supreme Court made a landmark ruling in the case of Miranda v. Arizona when it made a decision on how suspects are to be informed of their constitutional rights when they are arrested on felony or misdemeanor charges. Ernesto Miranda was arrested in 1963 on suspicion of kidnapping and rape. After a long interrogation, Miranda confessed to the charges and signed a statement that his confession was made willingly and knowingly and that he understood his legal rights. When his case went to trial, his lawyers discovered that he had not, in fact, been informed of his constitutional rights to remain silent, to be represented by a lawyer, and to have that lawyer present during the interrogation. This Supreme Court ruling is one of the most famous cases in U.S. history, and it has changed the way arrests and interrogations have been handled ever since.

Miranda Rights Are Constitutional Rights

Because of Miranda v. Arizona, police officers are required to inform you of your rights before they begin an interrogation. Though some police departments may use different wording, the basis of the statements must be the same. Most police departments will use a version of the following: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to you. Do you understand the rights that I have just read to you?” It must be established that the suspect is aware of his or her rights before any interrogation can occur.

Misconceptions About Miranda Rights

The point of the Miranda Warning is to inform suspects of the rights that are granted to them by the United States Constitution. This includes the right to protection against self-incrimination and the right to legal counsel. Some people have misunderstandings about their Miranda rights and what that means for their criminal cases.

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Arlington Heights murder defense attorneyDuring normal conversation, words that have more than one meaning are often used interchangeably, such as robbery, theft, and burglary. In general, these words mean the same thing, but in a court of law, they all have very different meanings. The same goes for homicide, murder, and manslaughter - they tend to have a similar meaning in everyday life, but they all have different definitions and carry very different sentencing terms when used in a legal setting. A person who is charged with first-degree murder will be facing much more serious consequences than a person who is charged with involuntary manslaughter.

Homicide

When you are talking about homicide in a law setting, it simply just means the act of one person killing another person, which may or may not be illegal, depending on the circumstances. For example, if you use deadly force against someone because they attempted to commit a forcible felony (like robbing your home or committing an assault), your actions may not technically be illegal because of Illinois laws regarding justifiable use of force.

Murder

Murder is the term that is used when an unjustified killing is committed. It is broken down into degrees:

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Rolling Meadows construction zone speeding defense lawyerTraffic laws were put into place for a reason - to keep everyone safe while they are in and around motor vehicles. When someone violates these traffic laws, it can be dangerous for everyone involved, but if they violate traffic laws when driving through a work zone, the results can be deadly. According to the Illinois Department of Transportation, there were 6,741 crashes in Illinois work zones in 2016. In those accidents, 765 people were killed, and around 1,893 people were injured. 

Construction zones usually mean that there are more people near the road working, but drivers are actually more likely to become victims of construction zone crashes than workers. Illinois has some of the strictest construction zone traffic laws in the country, so it is important that you follow the rules for the sake of yourself and others.

1. Vehicle Occupants Are More Likely to Be Victims in Construction Zone Accidents

From 2013 to 2017, there were a total of 177 work zone accident fatalities in Illinois. Contrary to what you might think, the majority of those fatalities were not construction workers. In fact, only six workers were killed in construction zone collisions, meaning the other 171 deaths were drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or bicyclists.

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