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Arlington Heights criminal defense attorney

In Illinois, there are a few crimes that police officers take very seriously. One of those crimes is obstruction of justice. Obstruction of justice can be something as simple as providing a police officer with a false name or as serious as directly lying to a police officer about something he or she is questioning you about. No matter the act caused you to be charged with obstruction of justice, this crime is a felony in Illinois and can result in serious consequences that could follow you for the rest of your life. When facing these charges, it is best to consult with a criminal defense lawyer who has experience in obstruction of justice charges so you can plan an appropriate defense.

What Is Obstruction of Justice?

According to the Illinois Criminal Code of 2012, obstruction of justice occurs when a person intentionally prevents the apprehension or obstructs the prosecution or defense of a person and knowingly:

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Arlington Heights, IL defense attorney

There are a number of things that can cause a police officer to pull you over. Maybe your tail light was out, you did not use your turn signal, or you ran a red light. A police officer will likely pull you over for such violations. In some situations, an officer may request to search your vehicle. While the aforementioned violations could constitute a legal traffic stop, is it legal if the officer requests to search your vehicle? Technically, there are certain circumstances in which a police officer can search your vehicle without a warrant.

Police Searches of Vehicles

The Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution states U.S. citizens have the right to “be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” This means police cannot search your property for no reason. There are only a handful of situations in which a police officer can legally search your car without a search warrant.

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Rolling Meadows, IL defense attorney

In the United States, violent crime is not uncommon. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, there were more than 1.2 million violent crimes reported in the country in 2017. In Illinois alone, there were an estimated 56,000 incidences of violent crime that year. The state of Illinois defines violent crime as any felony crime that involves the use of force or the threat of force against the victim, or any misdemeanor crime in which death or great bodily harm comes to the victim.

Violent crime is taken extremely seriously and penalties for a conviction are severe. If you are charged with a violent crime, it is important you understand the potential consequences, and that you speak with a skilled criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

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Rolling Meadows, IL defense attorney

There are many consequences that can come with breaking the law. Depending on the crime, you could face community service, probation, fines, restitution, and in some cases, jail time. Another consequence of certain crimes can be asset forfeiture, where the government takes your belongings if they believe they are connected to a crime. This can be problematic, especially if you are innocent of the charges you face. 

Both the state and the federal government can seize assets if they believe they were acquired in illegal ways. According to the Illinois State Police and the U.S. Department of Justice, the state of Illinois has taken more than $319 million in assets from citizens since 2005, while the federal government has seized more than $404 million during the same period. If you are facing a seizure of your assets, it is important to have a criminal defense attorney by your side who will fight for you.

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Arlington Heights, IL defense attorney

While all assault and battery charges are serious, charges and punishments can become even harsher when the alleged assault and/or battery occurs between people in a domestic relationship. Being accused of domestic battery is extremely serious and can result in extensive jail time and expensive fines. It is also often used to leverage favorable decisions in child custody or other matters in contentious divorce proceedings.

Domestic Battery Laws in Illinois

The Illinois Penal Code states domestic battery occurs when a person knowingly and unlawfully causes bodily harm or makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature to a family or household member. It is important to note that the crime must be committed against a family or household member, or it cannot be considered domestic battery. According to the state of Illinois, family or household members include:

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