Blog
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in felony

Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney aggravated sexual assault

Out of all of the crimes that you could be accused of committing, sex crimes are some of the most unforgiving and harsh offenses to face. Sex crimes, such as sexual assault, are some of the most underreported crimes ever, yet they still appear in alarming numbers across the country. According to FBI crime statistics, there were nearly 140,000 police-reported cases of rape and sexual assault across the country in 2019. Sexual assault is a serious crime and is punished accordingly in Illinois; however, charges can be elevated even more to felony charges in certain circumstances. 

Sexual Assault

According to Illinois law, sexual assault occurs when a person commits sexual penetration and the person uses force or the threat of force or knows that the victim is unable to give knowing consent to the act. Criminal sexual assault is typically charged as a Class 1 felony in Illinois, which carries a prison sentence of 4-15 years and up to $25,000 in fines.

...

Arlington Heights, IL criminal defense attorney child endangerment

In today’s world, everyone is busier than ever, especially parents. Every second of every day seems to be filled with something, making it necessary to save time anywhere you can. In some cases, there just is not enough time to take your child in and out of their car seat every time you have to run an errand, especially if you are just making a quick stop, such as picking up prescriptions. According to Safe Kids, around 14 percent of parents have admitted to intentionally leaving their infants, toddlers, and kindergarten-aged children in a parked vehicle. While this may seem convenient to some, you could end up facing serious criminal charges in Illinois if you leave your child unattended in a vehicle. 

Understanding Child Endangerment Charges

According to the Illinois Criminal Code, child endangerment can be defined in two different ways. Child endangerment can mean:

...

Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney aggravated battery

The coronavirus pandemic has been prevalent in the United States since mid-March, with cases reaching to more than 5.4 million across the country. Some of the only ways that have been shown to reduce the transmission of the virus have been by implementing social distancing measures and mask mandates in public places. There are currently only 34 states that have issued a state-wide mask mandate, though other states have cities that have issued such guidance or require citizens to wear masks while in stores. In recent weeks, there has been an increasing number of disturbing assault and battery incidents across the country related to employees attempting to enforce their company’s mask-wearing guidelines for patrons. In response to this, Illinois has now made it an aggravated battery charge to assault a retail worker for communicating safety restrictions. 

Violent Incidents Are Becoming More Frequent

Just this past week, there were a number of mishaps that took place at retailers and other establishments across the country between employees and customers over face masks. In one incident, a 17-year-old employee of Sesame Place, a children’s theme park outside of Philadelphia, was punched in the face by a man and a woman after the teen reminded them of the park’s mask policy. Other violent incidents include one in which another 17-year-old working as a hostess at Chili’s was assaulted after she informed a party of 13 that they were unable to be seated together because of social distancing guidelines.

...

Rolling Meadows criminal law attorney

Not all crimes are created equally. Some crimes, like assault or murder, are much more serious than lesser crimes, such as theft or traffic violations. Illinois, like all states, has a system for classifying crimes. Crimes are placed into categories of felonies and misdemeanors, of which there are varying “classes” of severity. What many people do not know is that there are also certain factors that can increase or mitigate the severity of the punishment that is imposed on someone who is convicted of a criminal offense. It is important to understand the factors that are commonly used by the prosecution to enhance the charges to “aggravated” in Illinois.

Aggravating Factors in Illinois

Even if someone is convicted of a crime, that does not automatically determine the sentence that he or she will receive. Under Illinois law, a sentencing hearing will occur after the conviction in which a judge will review the case and make a decision as to what the appropriate sentence would be for the specific situation. In some cases, this is when the prosecution has the chance to present any aggravating factors that may be present, which could influence the judge to impose a more serious sentence. Illinois lists 32 unique aggravating factors that could affect a defendant's sentence. Some of the most common factors include:

...

Rolling Meadows criminal charges defense attorney

Being arrested for a crime can be a very traumatic experience. When you are arrested, you are handcuffed by the police officer and taken to be processed and held in jail. Your first thought when you land in jail might be, “How can I get out?” Usually, the quickest way to do that is to have a friend or family member post bail for you. Typically, weeks or even months can pass between your initial arrest and the disposition of your sentence. Posting bail allows you to be released from custody and go about your normal life until you are requested to appear back in court. It is important to understand how the bail process works in case you or your loved one is ever facing criminal charges in Illinois. 

How Is Bail Set?

Depending on the type of crime, you might be allowed to post bail the same night you are arrested. For offenses that are more serious, such as violent crimes, you may be required to remain in custody until you attend a bail hearing before a judge. During this hearing, the judge will determine whether or not you are eligible for bail and at what amount your bail should be set. Judges use a variety of factors to determine whether you should be eligible for bail, including the seriousness of the alleged offense, the risk that you may attempt to flee before your case can be heard in court, and the safety risks that you may pose to other individuals or the community.

...

CALL US TODAY AT 847-253-3400 FOR A FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION