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Arlington Heights, IL traffic crimes defense attorney

We all know what a construction zone looks like -- orange cones everywhere, blinking lights on reflective signs, men and women in hardhats working on the scene. Most states have specific traffic laws that must be followed when driving through a construction zone, including Illinois. In most cases, these laws are more strict than typical traffic laws. This is because these laws were put into place to protect the construction workers themselves, and also the drivers on the road. The most common construction zone violations are speeding violations, which are taken seriously by the state. According to the Illinois Department of Transportation, there were, on average, nearly 5,200 construction zone crashes each year between 2012 and 2016. Of the 683 fatal work zone crashes reported in Illinois in 2016, more than 27 percent involved speeding as a factor. Because of the increased risk in a construction zone, penalties for breaking the law in a work zone are typically also more serious than regular speeding penalties. 

Construction Zone Speeding Ticket Penalties

In Illinois, the first and second time you are issued a speeding ticket in a construction zone, it is considered a petty offense, meaning you face fines, not jail time as a punishment for your ticket. You face a minimum fine of $375 for a first offense of speeding in a work zone, with a possible maximum fine of $1,000. For a second speeding ticket in a construction zone, a minimum fine of $1,000 is imposed. The Illinois Secretary of State will also suspend the driver’s license of anyone who commits a second offense of speeding in a construction zone within two years of the first offense for at least 90 days.

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Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney traffic violation

Cell phones have proven to provide many benefits and much convenience, but as they become more prominent in our daily lives, they have also become more prone to have issues. The past couple of years have shown an upward trend in the number of cases of distracted driving across the United States. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), around 2,800 people died in distraction-related accidents while an estimated 400,000 people were injured in distracted-related driving accidents in 2018, the latest year for which data is available. In recent years, more states have passed laws making cell phone use and distracted driving illegal, as is the case in Illinois.

Illinois Cell Phone Laws

In Illinois, drivers are forbidden from using what the state defines as “electronic communication devices.” According to Illinois law, electronic communication devices include cell phones and any other small computer or handheld electronic device that is not integrated into your vehicle. The state of Illinois does not permit the use of electronic communication devices while driving. However, there are a few exceptions to that rule.

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Arlington Heights, IL criminal defense attorney traffic violation

With a legendary athlete in the news recently due to a serious car accident and with him having a history of being charged with reckless driving, it is an opportune moment to discuss this further, whether Tiger Woods is charged with any traffic violations or not. Overall, it is easy to shrug off most traffic violations as minor, but the truth is many of these violations can be considered from within the purview of criminal law; in fact, certain traffic violations, if serious enough to result in imprisonment, can result in either a felony or a misdemeanor. One of these crimes in Illinois would be reckless driving. Read on to learn the Illinois definition of reckless driving and how you can avoid driving recklessly.

Reckless Driving: Defined by Illinois State Law

With varying degrees of severity and different, more specific definitions of reckless driving with a diverse set of penalties and criminal classifications depending on the circumstances, it can be difficult to understand the Illinois law for reckless driving. In general, though, one of the following two facts must be true in order for the traffic violation to be considered the criminal act of reckless driving:

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IL defense lawyerThe majority of drivers in the United States will experience being pulled over by police at least once in their lifetime. With flashing lights behind you and a feeling of sinking dread in your stomach, being pulled over can be an anxiety-ridden experience. If you have never gone through a traffic stop before, you may not know what to do, and when we do not know what to do, we resort to instincts, which may not always be proper actions. Knowing what you should and should not do when you are pulled over by police may just prevent you from getting a costly traffic ticket.

  1. As soon as you see an officer flash his lights or sirens at you, you should begin to slow down and pull off on the right-hand side of the road. If there is no shoulder on the road, or it is too narrow to stop on, you should put your hazard lights on to signal to the police officer that you acknowledge that he is pulling you over and find a safe spot to stop.
  2. Once you are stopping, you should remain in your vehicle. Do not get out of your vehicle unless the officer asks you to do so. If you do get out of your vehicle, the officer may see this as aggressive behavior and a threat to his or her safety.
  3. You should roll your window down completely and place both hands so they are visible on the steering wheel. This allows the officer to see exactly what you are doing.
  4. When the officer reaches your window, he or she will ask for your license, registration, and proof of insurance. If you do not have these documents readily handy, you should tell the officer that you are reaching to your glovebox or underseat compartment to get them.
  5. You should answer any of the police officer’s questions in a polite and truthful manner. Even though you may be upset you are pulled over, you should be respectful to the officer.
  6. If the stop results in a ticket or an arrest, you should not argue with the police officer over why you were stopped or be uncooperative with the officer’s instructions. If you are being pulled over because of suspected DUI, you should comply with the officer’s request for chemical or field sobriety tests.
  7. Even if you believe the issuance of a ticket was unfair or unwarranted, you should not argue with the officer over the ticket. You will have the chance to present your side of the story at traffic court and explain why you think the ticket was unfair.

Get Representation from an Arlington Heights Traffic Ticket Defense Attorney

If you have ever been pulled over by police before, you know how upsetting it can be. You could follow all of these tips, do everything right and still be issued a ticket. If you have been issued a ticket for a serious traffic offense, it could adversely affect your driving record and carry a fine or even a possible license suspension. Getting a traffic ticket means that you should get immediate help from a Cook County traffic ticket defense lawyer. Scott F. Anderson, Attorney At Law, can help you plead your case in traffic court and fight to prevent a conviction. Call the office at 847-253-3400 to set up a consultation.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_337245230.jpgIt is likely that anyone who has driven in Illinois at one time or another looked into the rearview mirror and saw the flashing lights of a police car. If you have the habit of driving in excess of the speed limit, there may be a time when police will pull you over and write you a citation. In an effort to catch more speeding drivers and make the roads safer, police use a variety of tools and techniques to help them identify those violating posted speed limits.

Work-Zone Speeding

  • Police have increased their efforts in construction zones in an effort to protect the safety of workers.
  • Deployment of highly-visible photo enforcement vans plays a dual role in combating speeders. These tools help law enforcement identify speeding vehicles for issuing tickets, and the high visibility of such a van encourages others to slow down in construction zones.
  • The Illinois State Police are using federal grant money to hire more officers to help monitor construction zones. They feel the mere presence of a patrol vehicle often provides the necessary incentive for most drivers to slow down.

Roadside Speeder Identification

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