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Arlington Heights criminal defense lawyer, Arlington Heights DUI defense lawyer, Chicago DUI, Chicago DUI attorney, combat irresponsible drinking, driving under the influence, DUI lawyer, Illinois criminal defense lawyer, Illinois DUI Lawyer, irresponsible drinking, Naperville regulations, underage drinkingNaperville City Councilmen recently voted to forbid neighborhood bars from offering major beer discounts as a response to an alleged drunk driving crash and a downtown street fight video gone viral. These regulations were proposed in an effort to combat irresponsible drinking that can result in serious drunk driving accidents and anger problems among patrons. According to the Chicago Tribune, the new regulations will also require bar security guards to undergo additional training to work with intoxicated patrons and to help prevent similar issues in the future.

While skeptics of the proposed law anticipated that the public would not allow the Naperville council to pass such restrictive regulations, there has been no public outcry. The new rules specifically forbid bars from reducing the price of a drink more than 50 percent. The public—primarily bar owners and managers—have, however, "taken issue with proposals to limit maximum beer sizes to 20 ounces … and barring patrons from entering a bar an hour before closing."

Most drunk driving accidents occur when a bar patron leaves intoxicated and drives home. Illinois has dram shop laws that forbid a bar from serving an intoxicated person, but these are rarely enforced. According to the National Council of State Legislatures, however, any person who is injured by a drunk driver who was served while visibly intoxicated has a "right of action" against the drunk driver. The trick is to be able to present the correct evidence to prove this in court.

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Arlington Heights Criminal Lawyer, attorney, Chicago DUI, DUI lawyer, felony DUI, Illinois criminal defense lawyer, Illinois dui, illinois dui attorney, Illinois DUI Lawyer, underage drinkersIllinois has some of the toughest drinking and driving laws in the country, including a zero-tolerance policy for underage drinkers and felony charges for repeat offenders. Despite this, the problem of driving under the influence in Illinois continues to be a serious one.

According to the 2014 CyberDrive Illinois DUI Factbook, in 2012 there were more than 37,000 DUI arrests recorded by the Secretary of State’s Office. More than 300 people were fatally injured in an alcohol-related crash, accounting for 35 percent of all accident fatalities statewide in the same time period.

The penalties for drinking and driving are worse if the responsible person has an underage person in the car at the time of arrest. If the child is under 16, these penalties are even more harsh. A regular first conviction of DUI, for example, is a Class A misdemeanor, which results in the revocation of driving privileges and registration suspension. If a person is pulled over for DUI with a child under the age of 16—even if it is his or her first offense—the offender is additionally sentenced to a mandatory fine of $1,000 and 25 days of "community service in a program benefiting children," as noted in the Illinois DUI Factbook. Penalties are very strict if the child was injured while the driver was intoxicated. Any crash that resulted in bodily harm to a child under the age of 16 is automatically classified as a Class 4 Felony and carries an aggravated DUI charge.

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Chicago DUI attorney, criminal offense, drinking and driving, drinking and riding, DUI, DUI attorney, Illinois DUI Lawyer, motorcycle accident, motorcycle accidents, motorcyclist DUI, Scott F. AndersoDrinking and driving is widely understood to be a dangerous and possibly life-ending activity. And throughout the past decades several national and statewide practices have been enacted with the aim of curbing drunk driving and fatalities caused by it. For motorcyclists, however, the message can often get lost in the context of the subculture of motorcycles, at least according to Motorcycle.com. Motorcycle.com notes how the subculture that surrounds riding often involves drinking, and the incentive to stop drinking and riding has "done anything but gone away."

Massive riding festivals encourage pit stops for drinking at local bars, and cyclist bar hopping is a common activity anywhere in the country. Some motorcycle clubs have, of course, stepped up and spoken against this practice, issuing rules that riders cannot drink until the bike is parked for the evening. Regardless, drinking and riding is a serious issue that continues to cost the lives of many cyclists. More than 45 percent of all riders killed in accidents, repots Motorcycle.com using statistics from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, "have alcohol in their system at the time of death."

But there is more. Cyclists killed in accidents are 2.5 times more likely than passenger vehicle drivers to have alcohol in their system—a fact that is indicative of the sometimes dangerously permissive air that surrounds motorcycle culture. Despite increased awareness of the problem, it does not seem to be getting better. While the number of drivers involved in a fatal crash with a BAC of .08 or higher decreased six percent in 2007, the number of motorcyclists with a BAC of .08 or higher actually increased by 10 percent.

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soda, alcohol, blood alcohol content, BAC, DUI, drinking and driving,

The results of a new study indicate that artificial sweeteners, like those found in diet sodas, increase people’s blood alcohol concentrations.

The study was conducted by Dr. Cecile A. Marczinski and lab assistant Amy L. Stamates at the Northern Kentucky University. The results were published in the medical journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. There were eight men and eight women, between the ages of 21 and 33 years old, that participated in the study. People who were infrequent drinkers were not included in the study. Also excluded were people with diabetes, psychiatric disorders, head trauma or any other injuries to the central nervous system, or anyone who has substance abuse problems. Participants came to three different sessions where they were given random drinks and then had their blood alcohol content measured. The drinks the study subjects were given were either vodka and Squirt soda, vodka and Diet Squirt soda, or vodka and a placebo drink. The drinks contained 1.97 ml/kg vodka mixed with 3.94 ml/kg of the soda or placebo. The vodka used in the drinks was 40 proof. The participants who consumed the drinks with the diet soda had significantly higher blood alcohol content than those that consumed the drinks made with regular soda. Levels measured averaged 18 percent higher. Those people also had greater impairment and slower response times. The conclusion of the study was that diet soda mixed with alcohol will result in higher blood alcohol contents than regular soda mixed with alcohol. The results of the study confirm findings from previous studies done about how diet sodas can affect blood alcohol levels. In 2011, a group of researchers surveyed people who were leaving bars. Participants of the survey shared what and how much they had drank, as well as letting researchers take breath samples. The study’s findings were that those that had consumed alcoholic beverages made with diet soda had higher blood alcohol readings. There are many things that can affect the results of a blood alcohol content test. If you’ve been arrested and charged with DUI, contact an experienced Arlington Heights criminal defense attorney to make sure your rights are protected.

BAIID IMAGEThe National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) have joined forces to push for the requirement of first time drunk driving offenders to use ignition interlocks that would stop the offenders from being able to start the vehicle if they had been drinking. Both organizations are urging all states to adopt that requirement.

Currently, twenty states and four counties in California have adopted the requirement of ignition interlocks for drivers who have been convicted of driving under the influence. In Illinois, an ignition interlock is only required for drivers who have requested permission for a restricted license, while still under suspension. It is also required for individuals who have multiple DUI convictions.

When an ignition interlock has been installed in a car, a driver has to blow into the device in order to give a breath sample. If the device reads a blood alcohol content of .05 or higher, the vehicle will not start. If the reading is negative for alcohol, the vehicle will start up. While the vehicle is in operation, the driver is required to provide random readings to ensure the driver’s blood alcohol level is still negative.

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