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Arlington Heights, IL criminal defense attorney sex crimes

Most people know that when they are convicted of a crime, the conviction will likely affect their lives in some way in the future. When it comes to certain offenses, such as sex crimes, the effect on your future can be a bit more severe than other crimes. Much of this is due to the fact that a conviction for most sex crimes will typically require you to register as a sex offender. Being a registered sex offender means you could be limited as to where you can live and work and you could also be subject to other requirements. If you have been charged with or convicted of a sex crime in Illinois, you should be aware of how the state Sex Offender Registry works. Here are a few common questions about the Illinois sex offender registry and their answers:

What Offenses Would Require Sex Offender Registration?

There are many criminal offenses in the state of Illinois that would require a convicted person to register as a sex offender. Typically, sex offender registration is required for misdemeanor and felony convictions for crimes such as:

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Rolling Meadows, IL sex crimes lawyer

Being convicted of any criminal offense is taken seriously in the state of Illinois. Felonies are the most serious types of crimes, and they come with many stipulations that can impact your life after your conviction. Even if you are convicted of a misdemeanor crime, you will have a criminal record, and you will face a certain stigma from those around you. If you are convicted of an offense that is sexual in nature, the penalties are often even more harsh and unforgiving. If you are found guilty of a sex crime, you can expect your life to be forever changed. Here are a few consequences of a sex crime conviction in Illinois:

  • You will be subject to registration requirements for at least 10 years. The state of Illinois requires those who are convicted of certain sex crimes to register as a sex offender every year for a period of 10 years. If you are deemed to be a “sexually dangerous” or “sexually violent” person, you will have to register every 90 days for the duration of your life. If you are deemed to be a “sexual predator,” you must register once a year for the duration of your life. Registration requires you to disclose your name, address, a current photo, place of employment, and all of your online identities, including usernames and email addresses.

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IL defense lawyerOne of the most damaging crimes a person can be charged with is a sex crime. Because of their violent nature, sex crimes are taken very seriously, as are their allegations. In some instances, you can be forced to register as a sex offender in Illinois for the rest of your life. The sex offender registry is a state-wide system that contains information about sex offenders, such as where they live if they are compliant with registration requirements, their convictions, and photos of them.

Offenses Requiring Sex Offender Registration

According to the Illinois Sex Offender Registration Act, registration is required when a person is convicted or adjudicated for crimes such as:

  • Indecent solicitation of a child;
  • Sexual exploitation of a child;
  • Charges involving juvenile prostitution or juvenile pimping;
  • Child pornography or aggravated child pornography;
  • Sexual assault or abuse, or aggravated sexual assault or abuse;
  • Predatory sexual assault of a child;
  • Ritualized abuse of a child;
  • Forcible detention, if the victim is under age 18;
  • Indecent solicitation of an adult;
  • Soliciting for a prostitute, pandering, patronizing or pimping, if the victim is under age 18;
  • A third or subsequent conviction of public indecency;
  • Custodial sexual misconduct;
  • Sexual misconduct with a person with a disability;
  • Permitting sexual abuse of a child; or
  • Sexually-motivated kidnapping or abduction, or sexually-motivated aggravated kidnapping, if the victim is under age 18.

In order for you to be required to register as a sex offender, you must also have been:

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Arlington Heights criminal defense lawyerCriminal convictions are serious matters – especially when they are classified as a felony. They can also result in some pretty concerning criminal consequences, such as prison time, fines, administrative fees, court costs, and attorney fees. However, consequences of a felony conviction typically go well beyond the courts and costs; there are also collateral consequences to consider. Learn more about them, and how an experienced criminal defense lawyer can help you avoid them, in the following sections.

Employment Opportunities

When you have a felony conviction, it remains on your record for all to see – and that includes potential employers. Some may have restrictions on whether you can work with their company, based on a certain type of conviction (i.e. a felony theft conviction could bar you from working with registers or money). You may also be ineligible for government jobs (including the armed forces), as well as any job that requires a special license (teachers, health care, etc.).

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Arlington Heights criminal defense lawyerSex crimes, in general, are severely punished in the state of Illinois. However, those that pertain to children often receive the heaviest of consequences. This includes (but is not limited to) the possession, distribution, and production of child pornography. Of course, not all cases are as clear-cut as they seem. So, if you or someone you love is up against child pornography charges, learn the consequences, along with what you may be able to do to protect yourself from them.

What Constitutes Child Pornography?

The term child pornography is a broad one, covering all types of media that depict a child (anyone under the age of 18) or disabled person engaging in a sexual act or a simulated sexual activity, including any acts involving penetration, oral sex, masturbation, sexual touching or fondling, and/or urination or excretion of a sexual nature. Owning, distributing, purchasing, possessing, creating, sharing, or selling any such content is illegal in the state of Illinois. So is the act of coercing, soliciting, persuading, enticing, or forcing a child or severely intellectually disabled person to create any such content.  

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