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Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney aggravated battery

The coronavirus pandemic has been prevalent in the United States since mid-March, with cases reaching to more than 5.4 million across the country. Some of the only ways that have been shown to reduce the transmission of the virus have been by implementing social distancing measures and mask mandates in public places. There are currently only 34 states that have issued a state-wide mask mandate, though other states have cities that have issued such guidance or require citizens to wear masks while in stores. In recent weeks, there has been an increasing number of disturbing assault and battery incidents across the country related to employees attempting to enforce their company’s mask-wearing guidelines for patrons. In response to this, Illinois has now made it an aggravated battery charge to assault a retail worker for communicating safety restrictions. 

Violent Incidents Are Becoming More Frequent

Just this past week, there were a number of mishaps that took place at retailers and other establishments across the country between employees and customers over face masks. In one incident, a 17-year-old employee of Sesame Place, a children’s theme park outside of Philadelphia, was punched in the face by a man and a woman after the teen reminded them of the park’s mask policy. Other violent incidents include one in which another 17-year-old working as a hostess at Chili’s was assaulted after she informed a party of 13 that they were unable to be seated together because of social distancing guidelines.

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Rolling Meadows, IL criminal law attorneyIn mid-March, communities across the United States experienced a shutdown of nonessential businesses and operations, a move made in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19, which has moved through the country like wildfire. Confirmed COVID-19 cases have peaked at more than 5 million nationwide, while plans to reopen and resume business as usual move forward in some states. The coronavirus pandemic has brought uncertainty into almost every aspect of our lives, even in the criminal justice system. Many criminal cases have been backlogged since March, while new cases have been accumulating, leaving many, like you, to wonder about the status of their case. As of early July, Cook County courts were instructed to begin resuming most court operations, with safety protocols put in place. If you have been charged with a crime in Illinois, you should expect to be notified about your modified court proceedings.

Safety Protocols Put into Place

An executive order signed by Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans allowed Illinois courts to resume court operations beginning July 6. However, the order also required the implementation of several health and safety protocols to help contain the spread of coronavirus. These protocols include:

  • Reducing the number of people entering the courts each day

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Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney aggravated DUI

One of the things that police patrols are constantly doing is looking for signs of impaired drivers on the roads. Impaired and drunk driving are responsible for many traffic accidents and deaths each year in the United States. According to the latest data available from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were more than 10,500 deaths from drunk driving accidents in this country in 2018 alone. Any type of DUI charge is serious, but charges are increased when a DUI incident results in the injury or death of another person. In these cases, the impact a DUI conviction could have on your life could be severe, so it is important to understand the consequences you may face in Illinois.

DUI Resulting in Injury

If you are charged with a DUI and that incident resulted in the bodily harm, injury or death of another person, it is likely that you will be charged with a felony DUI. In Illinois, all felony DUIs are referred to as aggravated DUIs. If you were charged with a DUI and you caused an accident that resulted in great bodily harm, permanent disability, or disfigurement to another person, you will be charged with a Class 4 felony. This means that you could face between one and four years in prison, up to $25,000 in fines, and a minimum two-year driver’s license revocation.

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Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney plea bargain

If you have ever seen any kind of crime drama movie or TV show, you have probably seen some sort of heated scene take place in a courtroom where the main character’s attorney fights for his or her client’s freedom by attempting to prove his or her innocence. In reality, more than 97 percent of criminal cases are resolved by plea bargains, according to the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL). Plea bargains were created in response to a number of issues faced during criminal trials, such as the length of time it takes to go through a trial and the expenses associated with that legal process. However, some argue that plea bargains take away the right to a fair trial.

Understanding Plea Bargains

A plea bargain is an agreement made between the defendant (the person who is accused of the crime) and the prosecutor (the attorney representing the local, state, or federal government entity) as a replacement to a jury trial in a criminal case. The agreement usually involves the defendant pleading guilty or nolo contendere, “no contest” to some or all of the charges that were brought against him or her. Typically, plea bargains involve a reduction in the number of charges brought against the defendant, the severity of the charges, a reduction of the severity of the sentence, or a combination of any of the three.

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Rolling Meadows, IL criminal defense attorney BUI

Summer is a beautiful time in northern Illinois. Temperatures rise and allow everyone to spend time outdoors after a long and cold winter. With one of the country’s Great Lakes next door and a sprinkling of smaller lakes and rivers throughout the state, boating and other watersports are a favorite summer pastime for many Illinoisians. Spending time with family and friends often includes alcohol, which can make for a fun time, but it can also cause issues if you are not responsible. In Illinois, operating a boat and operating a car are two very comparable things from a legal standpoint. Many people do not realize that there are laws in Illinois that make it illegal for you to operate a boat or other watercraft while you are under the influence of drugs or alcohol. If you are charged with boating under the influence (BUI), the penalties can be harsh.  Therefore, it is important that you are aware of them so you do not unintentionally break them.

BUI Laws Do Not Apply Only to Alcohol

Just like driving under the influence (DUI), there are multiple ways you could be charged with a BUI. The Illinois Boat Registration and Safety Act states that a person is guilty of BUI if he or she is in control of the watercraft and:

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