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Rolling Meadows, IL traffic violation defense attorney

Every motorist in Illinois is required by law to move out of the way when an emergency vehicle is coming down the street. If you do not move, then you may be issued a serious traffic ticket. What some people may not know is that you are also required to move to the farthest lane if you approach an emergency vehicle that is stopped on the side of the road. This is called the “Move Over” law, and it was created to attempt to prevent harm from coming to police officers and other emergency workers when they are responding to a call.

What Is Scott’s Law?

The Move Over law is also known as Scott’s Law, and it is named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen of the Chicago Fire Department, who was struck and killed by an intoxicated driver when he was helping at the scene of a car accident on a Chicago expressway. Scott’s Law states that when an authorized emergency vehicle gives a signal or displays flashing lights, all drivers must make an effort to change lanes to one that is not next to the emergency vehicle or reduce their speed and proceed with caution if changing lanes is unsafe or impossible.

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Rolling Meadows, IL driver's license reinstatement attorney

Having the ability to drive is something that the majority of Americans rely on to go about their day-to-day lives. We use our vehicles to go to work, school, doctor’s appointments, and run errands. Losing the ability to drive can be annoying for some, and it may be financially crippling for others. In Illinois, there are two common ways that you can lose your driving privileges: through a license revocation or a license suspension. Though the terms might seem like they can be used interchangeably, they are actually two different penalties that can apply to drivers, and they carry different consequences.

License Suspensions

A driver’s license suspension is a less-permanent form of losing your driving privileges. Typically, license suspensions are the result of lesser violations when compared to license revocations. If your license is suspended, you will usually lose your driving privileges for a specific length of time. When that period is up, you may pay a reinstatement fee, and you will likely be able to get your driving privileges back unless your offense has specified otherwise. Common reasons your license can be suspended include:

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Rolling Meadows, IL drug charges defense attorney

Following the trend of many other states in the United States, Illinois has adjusted its legal policies regarding marijuana. Illinois has seen an evolution of the state’s acceptance of this form of drugs. Initially, marijuana was illegal, then medical marijuana use became acceptable, and soon after recreational use followed suit. Illinois may be the eleventh state in the country to legalize marijuana; however, its policies are not uniform to those in other states. Due to these recent legal changes, it is important to note what is considered acceptable and what remains illegal in Illinois to avoid facing drug charges in the future.

House Bill 1438 Explained

This past June, Governor J.B. Pritzker signed HB 1438 into law, legalizing recreational marijuana. Under this new law, adults will be legally able to use and sell marijuana for more than just medical purposes. This law goes into effect on January 1, 2020, giving those who are 21 and older a new sense of freedom regarding marijuana use that did not previously exist in Illinois.

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Rolling Meadows, IL expungement lawyer

Having a criminal record can make impact your life negatively in many ways. It can be much more difficult to rent a house or apartment, pass a background check for potential employment, or even obtain a loan or mortgage. You do not even have to be convicted of a crime to have a criminal record; if you have ever been arrested or charged with a crime, you have a criminal record. These records are public, meaning anyone who wants to see your record can, including friends and family. Fortunately, you have options when it comes to clearing your criminal record in Illinois.

Expungement Versus Sealing

There are two main ways you can clear your criminal record in Illinois: through expungement or sealing. Although both methods are similar to each other, they do not produce the same exact result. Expungement results in your criminal records either being returned to you or being destroyed. This makes it as if you never had a criminal record at all and does not allow the police, government, or the public to view these records. If you seal your record, they are hidden from the public, but they are not erased. This means your records will still be visible to the government and to law enforcement.

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Rolling Meadows, IL drug possession lawyer

It has often been said that dogs are a man’s best friend, and that makes perfect sense when you look at the relationship that humans and canines have had for years. For centuries, dogs have been beloved companions, and dogs often work alongside law enforcement professionals in the field. Today, tens of thousands of dogs work with their police officer handlers, and one of their most common duties is to use their exceptional olfactory abilities to sniff out illicit substances. During traffic stops, it is not uncommon for an officer to use a drug-sniffing dog, but the legality of this tactic has been questioned.

Does This Violate Fourth Amendment Rights?

The first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution are called the Bill of Rights, and they include many rights that are core American values, including the right against unreasonable searches. The Fourth Amendment contains this right and states that American citizens have the right to “be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects,” and for those things to be free from “unreasonable searches and seizures,” unless a warrant has been issued.

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